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Campus Chemical Instrument Center Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CCIC NMR)

Summary:

The CCIC NMR Facility is a state-of-the-art campus-wide core facility that currently houses nine high resolution Bruker NMR spectrometers (600 to 850 MHz) with a range capabilities: high-sensitivity cryoprobes for structural and dynamics studies of proteins, nuclei acids and their complexes, high-throughput sample changers (SampleCase and SampleJet) for metabolomics and drug screening for discovery, solid state probes for biomolecules and materials, micro-imaging and diffusion. The facility is located on both North Campus (CBEC building) and South Campus (Riffe building), which are within 15 minutes walking distance. This shared facility is one of the premier facilities of its kind in the US and is available to scientists within and outside of the OSU.

In addition, a cutting-edge ultrahigh field 1.2 GHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), which will be the centerpiece of the new National Gateway Ultrahigh Field NMR Center. Once commissioned, this next generation NMR instrument will be open to U.S. NMR researchers in the fields of biomolecular NMR of proteins and nucleic acids in solution and in the solid state, materials science, and metabolomics. The instrument will be run and maintained by CCIC NMR Facility staff.

About Facility Organization - the NMR facility operates under the administrative umbrella of the CCIC through the Office of Research (OR). It was founded in 1981 to provide state-of-the-art technology and services to all campus-wide researchers. The operation and service expenses are covered by user fees.

For citations please use this text: "Acknowledgement: This study made use of the Campus Chemical Instrument Center NMR facility at Ohio State University."

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    Instruments

    • Bruker Avance III HD 800 MHz ( NMR instrument )

      For citations please use this text: "Acknowledgement: This study made use of the Campus Chemical Instrument Center NMR facility at Ohio State University."

      Bruker Avance III HD 800 MHz : This NMR is equipped with a quadruple resonance inverse (QCI-P) cryoprobe (ca. 7400:1 proton signal/noise ratio and 1500:1 carbon signal/noise ratio), a SampleCase capable of handling up to 24 samples at room temperature in automation, an Automated Tuning & Matching (ATM) module, and a BSNL nitrogen liquefier. The nitrogen liquefier, capable of zero nitrogen boil-off, significantly reduces maintenance and enables up to two months of uninterrupted use of the system. The QCI-P cryoprobe offers a fourth, phosphorus channel to facilitate backbone assignment studies of nucleic acids. The high sensitivity and resolution of the instrument makes it ideal for high-throughput studies of complex mixtures (metabolomics), as well as biological studies of proteins and nucleic acids and their complexes.

    • Bruker Avance III HD Aeon Wide-Bore 800 MHz ( NMR instrument )

      For citations please use this text: "Acknowledgement: This study made use of the Campus Chemical Instrument Center NMR facility at Ohio State University."

      This wide-bore solid state NMR instrument has a plethora of advanced solid-state probes capable of analyzing a wide range of biological solids, powders, and micro-crystalline samples, including:

      2 x 3.2 mm Efree HCN MAS probe with spinning speeds up to 25 kHz offers minimal radio frequency (RF) heating and excellent RF performance and tuning stability. This probe is ideal for studies of biological solids such as membrane proteins.

      3.2 mm HXY MAS wide-bore probe, with a proton channel and interchangeable X & Y channels capable of studying a multitude of nuclei from nitrogen up to phosphorus. This probe is ideal for studies of solid inorganic materials and polymers.

      1.9 mm HCN MAS probe, with spinning speeds up to 42 kHz, is capable of averaging out the detrimental dipolar and chemical shielding interactions, thereby dramatically improving sensitivity and resolution of the experiments.

      1.3 mm HCN MAS probe, with spinning speeds up to 67 kHz, is capable of averaging out the detrimental dipolar and chemical shielding interactions, thereby dramatically improving sensitivity and resolution of the experiments. This probe is ideal for experiments employing proton detection for enhanced sensitivity.

      0.7 mm HCND MAS probe, with spinning speeds up to 111 kHz, is capable of averaging out the detrimental dipolar and chemical shielding interactions, thereby dramatically improving sensitivity and resolution of the experiments. This probe is ideal for experiments employing proton detection for enhanced sensitivity.

      The instrument includes a standard-bore shim insert making it possible to interchange many of the probes with the Ascend 800 MHz instrument, maximizing the available capabilities of the facility at any given time. The state-of-the-art Aeon magnet requires no liquid helium fills on a regular basis and is equipped with a helium liquefier, capable of near zero helium boil-off, thereby eliminating routine maintenance and down-time of the system.

    • Bruker Avance III HD Ascend 600 MHz ( NMR instrument )

      For citations please use this text: "Acknowledgement: This study made use of the Campus Chemical Instrument Center NMR facility at Ohio State University."

      This NMR is equipped with a 5 mm broadband (BBFO) “Smart” probe (ca. 700:1 proton signal/noise ratio and 400:1 carbon signal/noise ratio), a SampleCase capable of storing up to 24 samples at room temperature and automated loading of samples, and an Automated Tuning & Matching (ATM) module. Combined with its excellent line shape this probe facilitates superior single or multiple solvent suppression using presaturation or pulsed field gradients as required for samples from reaction control, biological samples and body fluids. This system is ideal for a wide range of applications from routine 1H NMR measurements on small molecules to advanced research applications including inverse experiments requiring excellent solvent suppression. The direct detection capability of the BBFO probe allows easy performance of many heteronuclei, including 19F and 31P experiments.

    • Bruker Avance III HD Ascend 700 MHz ( NMR instrument )

      For citations please use this text: "Acknowledgement: This study made use of the Campus Chemical Instrument Center NMR facility at Ohio State University."

      This NMR is equipped with a triple resonance observe (TXO) cryoprobe (ca. 4400:1 proton signal/noise ratio and 3100:1 carbon signal/noise ratio), a temperature controlled SampleJet capable of handling up to 510 samples at a desired temperature (≥ 4°C), an Automated Tuning & Matching (ATM) module, and a BSNL nitrogen liquefier. The combination of the long liquid helium hold times of this Ascend generation magnet and the nitrogen liquefier, capable of zero nitrogen boil-off, minimizes maintenance and enables nearly uninterrupted use of the system for over 5 months. The instrument is ideal for high-throughput studies of complex mixtures (metabolomics) as well as biological studies of proteins and nucleic acids. The high-sensitivity carbon detection offers unique capabilities to study systems with poor proton signal dispersion, such as natural products (which are often sample limited), intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), polysaccharides, and nucleic acids. This instrument has the highest 13C- and 15N-detection sensitivity of all our solution NMR instruments and it is therefore attractive for chemical reaction analysis in organic chemistry.

    • Bruker Avance III HD Ascend 850 MHz ( NMR instrument )

      For citations please use this text: "Acknowledgement: This study made use of the Campus Chemical Instrument Center NMR facility at Ohio State University."

      Bruker Avance III HD Ascend 850 MHz: The NMR is equipped with a triple resonance inverse (TCI) cryoprobe (ca. 10,000:1 proton signal/noise ratio and 2000:1 carbon signal/noise ratio), a SampleCase capable of handling up to 24 samples at room temperature in automation, an Automated Tuning & Matching (ATM) module, and a BSNL nitrogen liquefier. The nitrogen liquefier, capable of zero nitrogen boil-off, significantly reduces maintenance and enables up to seven weeks of uninterrupted use of the system. With its remarkably high sensitivity and resolution, this instrument is ideally suited for high-throughput studies of complex mixtures (metabolomics), as well as biological studies of large proteins and nucleic acids.

    • Bruker Avance III HD Ascend Dual-Receiver 850 MHz ( NMR instrument )

      For citations please use this text: "Acknowledgement: This study made use of the Campus Chemical Instrument Center NMR facility at Ohio State University."

      Bruker Avance III HD Ascend Dual-Receiver 850 MHz: The NMR is equipped with a triple resonance inverse (TCI) cryoprobe (ca. 10,000:1 proton signal/noise ratio and 2000:1 carbon signal/noise ratio), a temperature controlled SampleCase capable of handling up to 24 samples at ≥4°C in automation, an Automated Tuning & Matching (ATM) module, dual proton and carbon receivers, and a BSNL nitrogen liquefier. The nitrogen liquefier, capable of zero nitrogen boil-off, significantly reduces maintenance and enables up to seven weeks of uninterrupted use of the system. The instrument is also equipped with a dual-receiver that allows the possibility of the accelerated parallel acquisition of datasets. With its remarkably high sensitivity and resolution, this instrument is ideally suited for high-throughput studies of complex mixtures (metabolomics), as well as biological studies of large proteins and nucleic acids.

    • Bruker Avance III HD Ascend Narrow-Bore 800 ( NMR instrument )

      For citations please use this text: "Acknowledgement: This study made use of the Campus Chemical Instrument Center NMR facility at Ohio State University."

      Bruker Avance III HD Ascend Narrow-Bore 800 MHz : This multi-purpose NMR instrument has wide range of solution and solid-state capabilities including:

      4.0 mm gradient hr-MAS probe with proton, carbon, and nitrogen channels as well as a deuterium lock. This probe is ideal for studies of biological solids such as membrane proteins and tissue samples.

      2.5 mm tri-gamma MAS probe, with a proton channel and interchangeable X & Y channels capable of studying a multitude of nuclei from nitrogen up to phosphorus. This probe is ideal for studies of solid inorganic materials and polymers.

      5/10 mm Micro5 / Diff30 imaging and diffusion probe, coupled with 40 Amp triple-axis XYZ gradients, is capable of MRI studies of samples up to 10 mm in diameter.

      5 mm QXI-F solution state room-temperature probe (ca. 1200:1 proton signal/noise). The unique fluorine channel makes this probe ideal for studying fluorine-fluorine and fluorine-proton interactions in soluble fluorinated materials.

      5 mm TXI solution state room-temperature probe (ca. 2000:1 proton signal/noise). The high resolution of this system is ideal for a wide range of applications from routine 1H NMR characterization of small molecules to advanced research applications of complex mixtures (metabolomics) and biological studies of proteins and nucleic acids and their complexes.

      The long hold times of liquid helium (over 5 months) and liquid nitrogen (3 weeks) of this Ascend generation magnet reduces maintenance and down-time of the system.

    • Bruker Avance III HD Ascend Wide-Bore 600 MHz with DNP ( NMR instrument )

      For citations please use this text: "Acknowledgement: This study made use of the Campus Chemical Instrument Center NMR facility at Ohio State University."

      This wide-bore solid state NMR instrument is equipped with a 395 GHz Gyrotron for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP). This instrument is capable of utilizing DNP of solid samples doped with compounds containing electron radicals, typically enhancing the NMR spectral sensitivity by 10 to 100 fold. The system is equipped with several DNP and room-temperature probes for studying biological solids, powders, and micro-crystalline samples including:

      3.2 mm HCN low-temperature MAS probe for DNP. Experiments are carried out at 100 K for efficient transfer of electron polarization to the nuclear spins of interest, with MAS speeds of up to 17 kHz. The probe is set up for triple resonance proton, carbon, and nitrogen and is ideal for studies of biological solids.

      3.2 mm HX low-temperature MAS probe for DNP. Experiments are carried out at 100 K for efficient transfer of electron polarization to the nuclear spins of interest, with MAS speeds of up to 17 kHz. The variable X channel makes it of particular interest for studies of inorganic solids and polymers.

      1.9 mm HCN MAS probe, with spinning speeds up to 42 kHz, is capable of averaging out the detrimental dipolar and chemical shielding interactions, thereby dramatically improving sensitivity and resolution of the experiments.

      The 7 T gyrotron magnet is cryogen-free, requiring little or no maintenance for microwave generation. The long hold times of liquid helium (over 4 months) and liquid nitrogen (3 weeks) of the 600 MHz Ascend NMR magnet reduces maintenance and down-time of the system.

    • Bruker Avance III HD Ultrashield 600 MHz ( NMR instrument )

      For citations please use this text: "Acknowledgement: This study made use of the Campus Chemical Instrument Center NMR facility at Ohio State University."

      This NMR is equipped with a triple resonance inverse (TXI) cryoprobe (ca. 6000:1 proton signal/noise ratio), a temperature controlled sample robot (SampleJet) capable of handling up to 510 samples at a desired temperature (≥ 4°C), and an Automated Tuning & Matching (ATM) module. The instrument is ideal for high-throughput studies of complex mixtures (metabolomics) as well as biological studies of proteins and nucleic acids.

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    Last updated: 2020-11-03T12:54:20.733-05:00

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